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Driver Acceptance of New Technology

2 February 2014

Acceptance of new technology and systems by drivers is an important area of concern to governments, automotive manufacturers and equipment suppliers, especially technology that has significant potential to enhance safety. To be acceptable, new technology must be useful and satisfying to use. If not, drivers will not want to have it, in which case it will never achieve the intended safety benefit. Even if they have the technology, drivers may not use it if it is deemed unacceptable, or may not use it in the manner intended by the designer. At worst, they may seek to disable it.

A new book edited by Michael A. Regan, University of New South Wales, Australia, Tim Horberry, University of Queensland, Australia and Alan Stevens, Transport Research Laboratory (TRL ) UK, brings into a single edited volume the accumulating body of thinking and research on driver and operator acceptance of new technology. Bringing together contributions from international experts from around the world, the editors have shaped a book that covers the theory behind acceptance, how it can be measured and how it can be improved. Case studies are presented that provide data on driver acceptance of a wide range of new and emerging vehicle technology.

Driver Acceptance of New Technology, Theory, Measurement and Optimisation